Degree Types

     

Type of Offering

Degree Types

A growing number of corporations are seeking to improve their social and environmental impact, while meeting their economic bottom line. Social Impact Management is a course of study offered by the Heller MBA in Nonprofit Management, which will prepare students to identify opportunities for improving social impact and implement them successfully. As defined by Mary Gentile of the Aspen Institute’s Business and Society Program, “Social Impact Management is the field of inquiry at the intersection of business practice and wider societal concerns that reflects and respects the complex interdependence between the two, and that focuses on how to manage this complex interdependency to the mutual benefit of both.”

Gentile points out that: “There is a long history of attention to the intersecting roles and impacts of business and of the wider society of which business is a part…The terminology used to describe this area of exploration includes: business ethics, corporate social responsibility, corporate social performance, business and society, business in society, corporate sustainability, and increasingly …the triple bottom line.” Social Impact Management builds upon these efforts, but differs by being more pragmatic – less about advocacy than about open and critical inquiry; and more integrative – exploring the management of social impact not only in separate courses but also within the traditional management disciplines.

Beyond the core MBA curriculum, two other courses are required for Social Impact Management. In Corporations and Communities, students are introduced to cutting edge strategies in corporate social responsibility. In Social Entrepreneurship, they gain the tools for effectively launching new enterprises and programs: planning for their social impact, bringing them to scale, and ensuring their replicability and sustainability. Both courses bring corporate and non-profit leaders into the classroom to meet with students.

For their remaining electives, students may choose from a wide array of elective courses offered at the Heller School and the International Business School at Brandeis, and through the Boston Consortium. To acquire additional tools for effective social impact management, students may choose from courses such as Corporate Governance, Supply Chain Management, Business Dynamics and Operational Risk Management. To build expertise for the management of social impact in specific policy arenas, students may choose courses such as Principles of Ecology, Environmental Impact Assessment, Assets and Social Policy, Gender and Development, and the entire array of courses offered through the Heller MBA concentrations in Health Care Management, Child, Youth and Family Management, Aging Services Management, and Sustainable Development.

The Social Policy and Management concentration prepares students with a broad set of management skills to work successfully in a wide range of organizations with social missions, aware of and responsive to the social policy context in which they work.

For students who want to bring leadership skills to a variety of social issues, the Social Policy and Management concentration is ideal. Upon completion of their MBA, graduates in Social Policy and Management take on a variety of leadership roles in the non-profit, for profit, and public sectors.

Like the other concentrations, the Social Policy and Management concentration provides a solid basis in the fundamental management disciplines. Then in addition, students who concentrate in Social Policy and Management have the opportunity to design a customized concentration in their particular area of social policy and/or management interest.

The Child, Youth and Family Services Management concentration prepares graduates for a wide variety of leadership and management roles in organizations whose mission it is to foster healthy development of children, youth, and families.

Students acquire technical skills through rigorous preparation in core management concepts, tools, and applications for use in government, not-for-profit, and private sector organizations. The curriculum combines theory and practice to ensure that graduates bring scholarly knowledge to bear on real-world problems.

Changes in the structure and functions of households and in the dynamics of neighborhoods, schools, and the workforce are just a few of the issues facing families today. In order to influence policies and manage programs to benefit children, youth, and families, scholars and professionals must understand the fundamentals of human development; the dramatic social, political, and economic changes affecting family and community life; and new directions in system and program design, organizational development, and social capital and community building. This requires knowledge of relevant theory and practice in the areas of demography, family structure, education, work and support systems for healthy development and self-sufficiency, early intervention and prevention strategies, positive youth development, asset mapping, and community building.

The concentration courses address these many issues with a focus on the broad spectrum of American policies that affect human development. Graduates of the program assume roles as managers, program planners, evaluators, policy analysts, researchers, and educators. In these positions, they influence the lives of many young people. The concentration helps students achieve their goals through mentoring and advising, formal courses, colloquia, research responsibilities, and informal interaction with faculty.

THE HEALTH CARE MANAGEMENT concentration prepares students to lead in the changing landscape and infrastructure of health care, a system that is complex in its structure, processes and outcomes.

This trillion-dollar industry is the largest service industry in the United States and is charged with the task of health promotion and prevention, plus the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The knowledge base and technology in this industry are expanding at an exponential rate. The issues now redefining health care include:

- The increasing concern with racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in health.
- The growing uninsured population.
- The continuing evolution of managed care.
- The concentration of provider institutions and insurers into fewer large competitors.
- The growing evidence for and awareness of the impact of behavior and lifestyle on health.
- The search for lower-cost alternatives.

Skilled health care managers who also have training in health policy analysis are in great demand in today's marketplace.

In this concentration, the U.S. health care system is examined from political, social, economic, and technical perspectives. The focus is on causes of disease; the structure and processes of health care organizations and service delivery systems; approaches to financing health care; the delivery of substance abuse and mental health services; racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities; and health care and its role in social change.

The Sustainable Development Concentration helps students develop an understanding of the sustainability of project goals beyond financial and organizational issues, and provides a foundation in the concepts and methods of sustainable development.

The concentration helps students gain an understanding of the current state of global development and engages students in critical thinking about reducing poverty, hunger and human inequality, and in conserving the environment. Sustainable Development concentrators will study a rights-based approach to social change and have the opportunity to take courses in project planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation.

The concentration is suited to early- to mid-career managers of domestic and international organizations working on poverty alleviation, community development, health care, women-in-development, biodiversity, conservation, disaster mitigation, small enterprise creation, and advocacy.

The Aging Services Management Concentration prepares students for a variety of leadership and management roles in organizations that serve the complex needs of the elderly.

To prepare graduates with the conceptual, factual, and technical knowledge necessary to meet the needs of the growing aging population, the Heller School, in partnership with Hebrew SeniorLife, has created a program to train the next generation of managers of aging services.

Students will be equipped with management concepts, tools, and applications for use in government, not-for-profit, and private sector organizations, along with knowledge about policy formulation and development relevant to the implementation of programs for aging individuals. The rapidly expanding aging population presents many challenges. There is an increased need worldwide for innovative and all-inclusive models of care to meet the range of services elders require.

The Aging Services Management concentration brings together an interdisciplinary faculty representing the fields of management, medicine, policy analysis, research, and other specialties. Building on the Heller School's core MBA curriculum and the expertise of managers and service staff, the concentration provides students with an understanding of the policy environment within which elders' needs are currently addressed, and brings perspective on future needs and policy trends.

Students will gain first hand exposure to the continuum of services used by seniors, including acute care, long- and short-term care, senior supportive housing and services, assisted living, adult day health, continuing care retirement communities, home health care, assistive technology, transportation, volunteer programs, and family support.

The Sustainable Development (SD) concentration examines and develops an understanding of the sustainability of project goals beyond financial and organizational issues, and provides a foundation in the concepts and methods of sustainable development. The concentration helps students gain an understanding of the current state of global development and engages students in critical thinking about reducing poverty, hunger and human inequality, and conserving the environment. SD concentrators will study a rights-based approach to social change and have the opportunity to take courses in project planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The concentration is suited to early- to mid-career managers of domestic and international organizations working on poverty alleviation, community development, health care, women-in-development, biodiversity, conservation, disaster mitigation, small enterprise creation and advocacy.

The Health Care Policy and Management concentration trains students to be leaders in the changing landscape and infrastructure of health care. Health systems are complex in their structures, processes, and outcomes. This trillion-dollar industry is the largest service industry in the United States and is charged with the task of health promotion and prevention, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of disease. The knowledge base and technology in this industry are both expanding at an exponential rate. Skilled health care managers with training in health policy analysis are in great demand in today’s marketplace.

The Child, Youth, and Family (CYF) Policy and Management concentration prepares graduates for a wide variety of leadership roles in organizations that foster healthy development of children, youth, and families. CYF students acquire technical skills through rigorous preparation in core management concepts, tools, and applications for use in government, not-for-profit, and private sector organizations. The curriculum combines theory and practice to ensure that graduates bring scholarly knowledge to bear on real-world problems.

The Social Policy and Management concentration prepares graduates with a broad set of management skills to work successfully in organizations with a social mission, aware of and able to respond to the social policy context in which they work. For students who want to bring management skills to a variety of social policy issues, the Social Policy and Management concentration is ideal. Upon completion of the MBA, graduates take on a wide variety of leadership roles in non-profit, for-profit and public sector organizations.