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Strategy
Instructor: Andrew Hahn

Many managers and planners – (USA and international) find themselves making community a central feature of their mission. Community can be a mission in and of itself or community might be seen as a way to achieve other outcomes such as deeper reach in social service delivery. Community building has also emerged as an important approach to rebuilding urban and rural communities through comprehensive strategies. This movement of civil society organizations working in partnership with donors and local policymakers uses a bottom-up approach to create an economic base, reduce poverty and improve the well-being of citizens in particular places. Clearly, effective community building takes place in different sectors and turns on a complex set of community-building skills. Learning from these experiences, and reviewing the context that has given rise to the call for community in so many settings, is the purpose of this half course.

The course will focus one part on context, history and background and one part on the practice of community-building, with an eye to the career goals and preparation of managers and planners.

In the introductory part of the course we will discuss the elasticity of the term “community building,” some historical themes, and how a term originally focused mostly on neighborhood revival in the USA is now also used in the context of building stronger ties among people who share specific interests (e.g., “micro-communities” defined by race, ethnicity, gender, religion, or other special group characteristics) and used by managers who would like to reinvent the workplace around community principles. With community building jargon increasingly entering into management and public policy literatures, managers and planners must understand the parameters of this “movement” and acquaint themselves with some of the skills and developments that people doing this work have found useful.

Instructor: Andrew Hahn

Many managers and planners find themselves making community a central feature of their mission. Community can be a mission in and of itself or community might be seen as a way to achieve other outcomes, such as a deeper reach in social service delivery. Community building has also emerged as an important approach to rebuilding urban and rural communities through comprehensive strategies. This movement of civil society organizations working in partnership with donors and local policymakers uses a bottom-up approach to create an economic base, reduce poverty and improve the well-being of citizens in particular places. Clearly, effective community building takes place in different sectors and turns on a complex set of community-building skills. Learning from these experiences, and reviewing the context that has given rise to the call for community in so many settings, is the purpose of this course.

Course Name: Strategic Management
Instructor: Thomas Mclaughlin, Carole Carlson

This course explores the mission-based manager’s need to think strategically and act effectively in a dynamic environment. You will develop skills for critically analyzing the components of markets, organizational structure, strategic plans, and strategic actions. The course will help you integrate and apply material learned in the various functional subjects you have studied.

The course material is highly varied and examines many aspects of American and international health and human services systems, competition, technology, and the environmental and ethical considerations in decision making. Case material will draw on both for-profit and non-profit examples and examine how leaders and managers in both can use strategic management as a force for both fostering positive social change and creating financially successful enterprises. Excellent analyses, both qualitative and quantitative, will be expected. You will learn that an organization’s strategy and its environment are linked in a system in which managers must constantly formulate, implement, execute and evaluate strategy.

Course Name: Strategic Management
Instructor: Thomas McLaughlin

This course explores the mission-based manager’s need to think strategically and to act effectively in a dynamic environment. You will develop skills for critically analyzing the components of markets, organizational structure, strategic plans, and strategic actions. You will develop practical planning tools for strategy including mission statements, leadership techniques, technological innovations, and organizational collaboration. The course will help you integrate and apply material learned in the various functional subjects you have studied.

The course material is highly varied and examines many types of organizations, the nature of the U.S. health and human services system, competition, technology, and the environmental and ethical considerations in decision-making. Excellent analyses, both qualitative and quantitative, will be expected. You will learn that an organization’s strategy and its environment are linked in a system in which managers must constantly formulate, implement, execute and evaluate strategy.

Because there is not just one "correct" solution to any strategy situation, and because authority in the governmental and nonprofit sectors is necessarily diffuse, managers must be able to persuade others. Therefore, a secondary goal of this course is for you to gain experience in formulating in-depth analyses and cogent, substantive arguments.