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Public & Non-Profit Management
Instructor: Janet Boguslaw

This course focuses on understanding the emerging field of asset policy and considers its contribution to the social policy agenda. Asset-building policies have the potential to reduce poverty, increase economic security, and address wealth inequalities. The course raises questions about how assets contribute across the life course to individual, family, community, and national well-being. We will familiarize ourselves with the emerging asset building literature and discuss how this approach constitutes a departure from traditional poverty frameworks. The course examines the institutional and structural conditions that limit or expand opportunities for wealth accumulation and retention, the role of assets in perpetuating inequalities, and explores opportunities for promoting asset building. We will spend some time understanding the extent to which traditional institutions (such as banks), policies (such as taxes), and programs (such as TANF) affect pathways out of poverty and economic and social stability.

Instructor: Susan Curnan, Lorraine Klerman

This course is designed to provide an overview of the strengths of children, youth, and families in the United States, as well as the problems affecting their well-being and some of the core policies and programs that have been established to address them.

The objective of this course is to engage students in critical thinking, dialogue, and debate about the policies and programs in their chosen field. The course provides some of the information that is essential to understanding the strengths of children, youth and families in the United States and of the problems, policies and programs that have been, or might be, developed to improve their well-being. Particular attention will be paid to those who are vulnerable as a result of economic insecurity or various types of discrimination.

Instructor: Susan Curnan

Managing systems and programs to benefit children, youth and families in America today means managing people in a time of fiscal constraint; high stakes accountability; and dramatic social, economic and political change –including demographic shifts, changes in the structure and functions of households, dynamics of neighborhoods, schools, the workforce and government leadership. On the other hand, this is a time of great knowledge development and organizational and civic innovation. This course examines many of the contemporary issues that challenge the technical, political and visionary skills of managers and leaders working toward improving the quality of life for American families.

The course helps students learn how to effectively design, implement, and evaluate policies and programs in the non-profit sector. Real-time cases and field work will draw on all three sectors of society, i.e., political sector (government or “the State”), social sector (CBOs and foundations, “Civil Society”), and economic sector (Business, “The Market). The specific content, field work and class discussions taken up in this class assumes that students have a working knowledge of the policies, problems, supports, and opportunities related to children, youth and families in the United States and an understanding of some of the science-based models that have been developed to improve their well-being.

Drawing on management and leadership, theories and practices, from the three sectors,

the course will require students to exercise many critical thinking and higher order skills demanded of managers and leaders today. The 50-hour field study is a unique opportunity to apply and practice newly acquired knowledge, skills and competencies.

Instructor: David Whalen

This course provides students with a basic grounding in key concepts of private fundraising and development. It will explore the role of private philanthropy in the management of non-governmental organizations, specifically the relationships between philanthropy and ethics; management decision making and the role of a "gift economy"; the role of leaders and boards in fundraising as well as options for structuring an integrated development plan.

Instructor: David Whalen

This course provides students with a basic grounding in key concepts of private fundraising and development. It will explore the role of private philanthropy in the management of non-governmental organizations, specifically the relationships between philanthropy and ethics; management decision making and the role of a "gift economy"; the role of leaders and boards in fundraising as well as options for structuring an integrated development plan.

Instructor: Stuart Altman, Stanley Wallack

An overview of the U.S. health care system is followed by a critical analysis of the major issues and trends in the health care field. The course will concentrate on the activities of federal and state governments and the private sector. In addition, the course will explore likely future issues affecting our health system. Of special concern is the issue of the large number of Americans with no or inadequate health insurance. A related problem, which will be highlighted as well, is the rising cost of medical care, which results in increases in the number of uninsured.

Instructor: Stuart Altman, Stanley Wallack

This course will survey and analyze the health care system in the United States, emphasizing the major issues and trends, which have made the subject of intense public concern. The course will cover the financing, delivery and payment of health care by both the public and

private sectors. While throughout the course the new national health reform, The Patient

Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA), will be weaved into the lecture, the lecture on

October 5th, will be entirely on the PPACA. The course will discuss the reasons for the large

number of Americans with no or inadequate health insurance and how PPACA will reduce the

number significantly. The high level of health care costs, which is consuming an ever larger

proportion of our national income, will be analyzed. While we spend far higher ercentage of our national income than any other country in the world, our quality of care is not the best and quality of care problems abound. An important aspect of the course will be to discuss past, present and potential solutions to improve the performance of the U.S. health system.

Course Name: State Health Policy
Instructor: Michael Doonan
Instructor: Susan Curnan

This course is about the last forty years (1969-2009) of social justice and social policy in the American Gay Rights Movement. It is about the development of social justice and social policy in America that is inclusive of sexual orientation and gender identity. And, it is about policy development, and human behavior, in America that reflects the full civil, political, legal and moral equality of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people.

Full equality for all Americans should be a given. But, it’s not a given for millions of Americans that are gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered. Nor is it a given for the more than 10 million children being raised by LGBT parents. Indeed, despite the recent political action and media attention of the past decade or two, the “mainstreaming” of LGBT citizens has not resulted in the marginalization of the prejudice this group of Americans face. One premise for this course is that significant change for LGBT citizens will come about through state and federal policy – and much is underway. This course will touch on a number of contemporary policy issues related to the following areas: relationship acceptance including marriage equality, civil unions and the role of faith communities; equal education and safe schools that are supportive of LGBT students and students parented by LGBT citizens; violence prevention, including hate crimes, suicide prevention, domestic violence; non-discrimination in employment, housing, commerce, the military; family building including adoption and foster care; health care access. Each policy topic will explore the rationale and problem to be addressed, current status of the policy and unpack the intensity of the policy debate.

Instructor: David Gil

This seminar develops theoretical perspectives on social policy, social justice, and social change, and suggests a framework for analyzing, developing, and evaluating social policies and systems of social policy.

The seminar assists students to think critically, to clarify their assumptions and values, and to develop their own positions on social issues, rather than to accept unexamined assumptions and positions that may be taken-for-granted in their respective cultures.

The orientation of the seminar is historical, cross-cultural, and multi-disciplinary. It uses insights from the life experiences of students, and from selected scholarly disciplines including anthropology, biology, demography, ecology, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychology, sociology, minority studies, women studies, and policy studies.

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