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Human Resource Management
Instructor: Jody Hoffer Gittell

This course explores human resource management as a way to achieve high levels of organizational performance, but also argues that treating workers well is one of the fundamental social responsibilities of any organization, and essential for achieving other aspects of the organization's social mission. We will focus on policies and practices that can increase your ability to enhance the value of people in the organizations you serve. These policies and practices include job design, hiring, training, performance measurement, promotion, compensation and benefits, retention, discipline and firing, and policies regarding job security and work/family accommodation.

Traditional human resource practices are designed to develop the skills and performance of staff members as individuals. However there is increasing evidence that people act not only as individuals but also as members of communities. We will draw upon the theory of relational coordination, which shows how relationships of shared goals, shared knowledge and mutual respect help organizations achieve their desired outcomes. We will learn how to design human resource practices that develop not only individual skills and individual performance, but also relational skills and collective performance.

Instructor: Jody Hoffer Gittell

This course explores human resource management as a way to achieve high levels of organizational performance, but also argues that treating workers well is one of the fundamental social responsibilities of any organization, and essential for achieving other aspects of the organization's social mission. We will focus on policies and practices that can increase your ability to enhance the value of people in the organizations you serve. These policies and practices include job design, hiring, training, performance measurement, promotion, compensation and benefits, retention, discipline and firing, and policies regarding job security and work/family accommodation.

Traditional human resource practices are designed to develop the skills and performance of staff members as individuals. However there is increasing evidence that people act not only as individuals but also as members of communities. We will draw upon the theory of relational coordination, which shows how relationships of shared goals, shared knowledge and mutual respect help organizations achieve their desired outcomes. We will learn how to design human resource practices that develop not only individual skills and individual performance, but also relational skills and collective performance.