10

     
International Management
Instructor: Susan Holcombe

Frameworks for Development introduces students to international development theory and practice. It lays the foundation to build a new generation of development practitioners who are trained to become agents in transforming the conditions that give rise to persistent poverty and to work toward a global society free of poverty, preventable disease and environment degradation.

Instructor: Lisa Lynch, Jasmine Waddell

This is a new course that provides an introductory

overview of the measurement, trends, consequences and policy responses

to poverty and inequality in the context of sustainable development.

‘Poverty, Inequality and Development’ is a foundation course that

introduces students to sustainable development theory and practice.

Topics include poverty, inequality, globalization, human rights,

gender, the environment, and the role of institutions. Students

examine what is known about the drivers of development as well as the

links among global and national policies, and actions for sustainable

development. The course takes a multi-disciplinary approach with

economic, sociological, cultural, and geographic perspectives on what

development is and what these different perspectives suggest for

poverty reduction. By the end of the course students should be able

to think through and continually revise the “theory” or approach that

will guide their own development practices. We encourage each student

to come to her/his own definition of sustainable development within

the general framework that sustainable development links

environmental, economic, and social priorities; intergenerational

equity; and global justice. We will examine theories of development

against the evidence of their ability to produce development that

reduces poverty and inequality. This course makes the interconnection

among the concepts of poverty, inequality, and development explicit,

and gives students an opportunity to develop their own theory of

change from current theories and propositions. This course should

advance each student’s understanding of gender, social inclusion and

sustainability through readings, discussions, and assignments.

Instructor: Maria Green

This course is designed to serve two purposes. First, to provide students with a solid understanding of international human rights standards and systems; and second, to explore the implications of a rights-based approach to poverty and to development. Students can expect to leave the course familiar with the central elements of human rights, including the creation of modern individual rights in the international legal system, the nature of these rights and of governments' obligations, the systems in place at the United Nations and elsewhere to protect people from human rights violations, and the practices followed by NGOs and others in pursuing human rights protection.

Instructor: Maria Green

This course is designed to serve two purposes. First, to provide students with a solid understanding of international human rights standards and systems; and second, to explore the implications of a rights-based approach to poverty and to development. Students can expect to leave the course familiar with the central elements of human rights, including the creation of modern individual rights in the international legal system, the nature of these rights and of governments' obligations, the systems in place at the United Nations and elsewhere to protect people from human rights violations, and the practices followed by NGOs and others in pursuing human rights protection.